Fish Stock Agreement Text

Straddling stocks are fish stocks that pass through more than one exclusive economic zone or are in more than one exclusive economic zone. The agreement was adopted in 1995 and entered into force in 2001. [1] The great migrain fish is a term that has its origin in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. It concerns fish species that carry out ocean migrations and also have a wide geographical coverage, and generally refers to tuna and tuna species, shark, marlin and swordfish. Inter-territorial fish stocks are particularly vulnerable to overfishing due to inefficient management regimes and non-respect for fisheries interests. After four years of complex negotiations between the coastal States of the Western and Central Pacific and the States fishing in that region, the Agreement on the Conservation and Management of Highly Migratory Fish Stocks in the Western and Central Pacific was launched for signature on 5 September 2000 in Honolulu. The agreement is one of the first regional fisheries agreements adopted since the conclusion of the UN Fish Stocks Agreement in 1995. The Agreement applies to all types of highly migratory fish stocks (defined as all fish stocks of the species listed in Annex I to the 1982 Agreement and to other fish species that the Commission may determine) within the Convention area, with the exception of sauries. The conservation and management measures provided for in the Convention shall apply to the entire area or to certain areas covered by the area covered by the Convention, in accordance with the provisions of the Commission. The Agreement also provides for special arrangements for the participation of fishing undertakings and areas covered by the Convention area.

On 5 September 2000, Chinese Taipei signed the Agreement on the Participation of Fishing Enterprises. On 2 November 2004, Chinese Taipei informed the depositary, in accordance with that Agreement, that it had met its national requirements and had agreed to be bound by the regime established by the Convention under Article 9(2) of the Convention and to participate in the Commission as a member. On 19 December 2003, New Zealand reported that rule 43 allows Tokele to participate in the Commission and its subsidiary bodies. The objective of the Agreement is to ensure, through effective management, the long-term conservation and sustainable exploitation of highly migratory fish stocks in the Western and Central Pacific, in accordance with the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea and the 1995 United Nations Convention on Fish Stocks. To this end, the agreement will establish a Commission for the Conservation and Management of Highly Migratory Fish Stocks in the Western and Central Pacific. The parties to the Convention are ipso facto members of the Commission. In accordance with Article 35(1), the Agreement shall be open for accession by the States referred to in Article 34(1) and by any entity referred to in Points (c), (d) and (e) of Article 305(1) which is in the Convention. . . .

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